National News + World News

How Obama's comments on race sparked very different reactions

 In some of the most personal and unscripted comments on race of his presidency, President Barack Obama broke his silence Friday with surprise remarks from the White House on Trayvon Martin, his first public comments since a Florida jury a

Aurora marks anniversary of movie massacre amid gun debate

One year after a gunman killed 12 people in an Aurora movie theater, the city is marking its losses with solemn moments and a continuing debate over the place of guns in society.

Longtime journalist Helen Thomas dead at 92

Longtime White House journalist Helen Thomas has died at age 92, sources told CNN Saturday. Thomas covered 10 presidents over nearly half a century, and became a legend in the industry.

Death Penalty Fast Facts

 Here's a look at what you need to know about the death penalty in the United States. Facts: Capital punishment is legal in 32 U.S. states. Approximately 3,125 inmates in 35 states are awaiting execution.

GRAPHIC WARNING: MA police photographer releases photos of Boston bomber surrendering to police

The backlash over Rolling Stone's cover photo of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev led to the release of new photos of his capture Thursday, images a police photographer said show "the real Boston bomber."

Extraordinary dog helps put child predators behind bars

One special dog is helping detectives in Tangipahoa Parish put child predators behind bars. Hayward the dog comes to work every day at the Child Advocacy Center in Hammond to do one important job.

All the world's gold came from collisions of dead stars, scientists say

All that glitters is not gold, they say. But all the gold in the world may come from astronomical events that send a lot of high-energy light out in space. Researchers have new evidence that gold comes from the collision of neutron stars.

The Lernstift smartpen checks your spelling as you write

Wher woud some of us bea withoot spell check? The sometimes annoying, but frankly indispensable computer aid has spared billions of typographical blushes.

Boy Scouts ban obese kids from program

Hiking! Zip-lining! Rock climbing! About 30,000 Boy Scouts and 7,000 adults are out in the mountains of southern West Virginia for the National Scouts Jamboree -- and they all had to meet a body mass index cut-off.

Policing advocates defend use of high-tech license plate readers

David Roberts remembers his days as a Denver police cadet in 1970: It was roll call, just like in the old TV dramas, and every cop was handed a "hot sheet" of vehicles totaling 10 pages, with license plate numbers printed in six columns. It was a